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SUBJECT: RE: Backfill- Compaction vs natural settlement
FROM: DEAN YOUNGKEIT young@brigham.net
DATE: 11/10/1999 9:19:00 PM
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March 12, 1999 Four Construction Innovators Receive
Prestigious NOVA Award (Ann Arbor, Michigan) The
Construction Innovation Forum, Inc.® (CIF) announced
today that four outstanding construction innovations
were honored with the CIF's prestigious NOVA Award at
the CIF's Tenth Annual Innovation Celebration Banquet.
The keynote speaker was Carleton Jones, Vice President,
Bentley Systems Incorporated, San Francisco,
California. His presentation was entitled,
"E-Constructors: Regional Innovation – Global Value".
Bentley, the largest privately held PC software
company, provides enterprises the software foundation
for planning, designing, engineering and managing
buildings, airports, plants, bridges, highways,
utilities and other large-scale infrastructure around
the globe. The NOVA Award, which is referred to as the
"Nobel Prize" for construction, is awarded annually to
revolutionary construction solutions, processes or
products that improve the quality, efficiency and cost
effectiveness of construction. A total of 31 NOVA
Awards have been presented since 1990. This year's
winners were selected from another record-setting 38
nominations coming from four different countries and
twenty different states. All of the nominees
participate in an exhaustive four-phase competitive
process before being selected by a distinguished panel
of ten judges. The four winners for 1999 include Amir
the Asphalt Multi-Integrated Roller for asphalt
pavement compaction, EcoSystem™ affordable, environment
friendly elevator, Humboldt Stiffness Gauge, Tru-Frame™
designed to reduce earthquake damage to steel
structures.The Construction Innovation Forum is an
international non-profit corporation that rewards
innovation in construction. Each year innovation is
recognized with the NOVA Award. The next NOVA Awards
ceremony will be held during the 11th Annual Innovation
Celebration on March 11, 1999. The event will be held
at the Laurel Manor in Livonia, Michigan. Tickets are
$200 per person, $1,400 per table of eight. Please
contact the CIF at (734) 995-1855 for a reservation
form, or print one directly from the web site at
www.cif.org. The winners of the 1999 NOVA Awards:
AMIR The Asphalt Multi-Roller (AMIR) is a new compactor
designed to compact Asphalt paving mixes in the field.
Its design is based on a theory that explains
the phenomenon of construction induced cracks in
asphalt pavements. It applies its compaction energy to
the asphalt mix in a way that differs from existing
vibratory, pneumatic, or static steel rollers. The AMIR
compactor was originated in Ottawa, Canada, and since
1987, a number of integrated field trails and
laboratory experiments have been carried out.
Comparative test results have been performed on asphalt
specimens from conventional and AMIR compacted
sections. These results show quite significant
improvements in density, tensile strength, fatigue life
and resistance to moisture damage. AMIR has been used
Australia, Canada,Egypt, and Sweden. EcoSystem™
In April 1998, Montgomery KONE introduced the
EcoSystem™ elevator, a new family of products for
vertical transportation. Members of the family include
EcoSpace™ and MonoSpace™, products that are used for
simplex or duplex installations that have 2 to 10
landings, up to 80 feet of travel, and operate at 200
fpm. EcoSpace™ has its controller closet located
adjacent to the hoistway at the top elevator landing,
and MonoSpace™ has its controller closet built into the
front wall of the hoistway at the top landing. The
compact EcoDisc™ hoisting machine is an AC gearless
motor of axial synchronous design with an integrated
traction sheave, brake flange, rotor. Compact and light
weight EcoDisc™, requires no penthouse or large machine
room. As its name suggests, EcoSystems™ is ecologically
responsible. Unlike hydraulic elevators that may
eventually develop leaks and harm the environment, the
system uses no hydraulic fluid. The system also uses
less electricity than hydraulic and traction elevators.
EcoSystm™, products features better space utilization
for the building owner, simplified installation for
contractors, and faster, smoother rides for passengers.
The Humboldt Stiffness Gauge The Humboldt Stiffness
Gauge (HSG) is a field instrument that has been
developed to nondestructively measure soil stiffness
and soil modulus. The HSG vibrates,imparting small
forces to the soil through a ring-shaped foot, and
causes small soil deflections. The instrument
determines the soil stiffness as the ratio of these
small forces to small deflections. It assumes a value
of Poisson’s ratio and derives Young"s soil modulus
from the stiffness. HSG measures soil stiffness in just
over a minute. Soil stress and strain are determined by
HSG at levels commonly found in soil application (3 to
5 psi). Because it vibrates from 100 Hz to 200 Hz, HSG
filters out soil deflection caused by nearby equipment.
By using soil stiffness measured with HSG along with
statistical quality control, the current over
specification and over compaction of soil can be
greatly reduced, thereby reducing compactive effort by
approximately 30%. When soil is compacted for
pavements,pipe bedding, backfills, and foundation, soil
density is used almost exclusively by the construction
industry to specify, estimate, measure and control soil
compaction. However, soil density may not be the
desired engineering property, instead, the desired
engineering property is the soil modulus or soil
stiffness. Development of the HSG began four years ago
with an FHWA contract to BBN Technologies of Cambridge,
Massachusetts in cooperation with CAN Consulting
Engineers of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The purpose of
this contract was to adapt the U.S. Army’s proven
technology for the detection of non-metallic land mines
to soil evaluation application for the construction
industry. Successful proof-of-principle demonstrations
were performed and Humboldt Mfg. Co., of Norridge
Illinois, was recruited to commercialize HSG.
The Construction Innovation Forum is an international,
non-profit organization established in 1987. Roger Lane
of DTE Energy is the organization’s Chair. The year
2000 NOVA Award Celebration will be held March 16 at
the Laural Manor,Livonia, Michigan.
For nomination forms, ticket sales or information about
the CIF please contact: The Construction Innovation
Forum, Inc.
350 South Main Street, Suite 350
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104-2131

Telephone: 734/995-1855; fax: 734/995-5002

e-mail: info@cif.org; web site:
http//www.cif.org
The Humboldt Stiffness Gauge (HSG) is a field
instrument that has been developed to nondestructively
measure soil stiffness and soil modulus. The HSG
vibrates,imparting small forces to the soil through a
ring-shaped foot, and causes small soil deflections.
The instrument determines the soil stiffness as the
ratio of these small forces to small deflections. It
assumes a value of Poisson’s ratio and derives Young"s
soil modulus from the stiffness. HSG measures soil
stiffness in just over a minute. Soil stress and strain
are determined by HSG at levels commonly found in soil
application (3 to 5 psi). Because it vibrates from 100
Hz to 200 Hz, HSG filters out soil deflection caused by
nearby equipment. By using soil stiffness measured with
HSG along with statistical quality control, the current
over specification and over compaction of soil can be
greatly reduced, thereby reducing compactive effort by
approximately 30%. When soil is compacted forpavements,
pipe bedding, backfills, and foundation, soil density
is used almost exclusively by the construction industry
to specify, estimate, measure and control soil
compaction. However, soil density may not be the
desired engineering property, instead, the desired
engineering property is the soil modulus or soil
stiffness. Development of the HSG began four years ago
with an FHWA contract to BBN Technologies of Cambridge,
Massachusetts in cooperation with CAN Consulting
Engineers of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The purpose of
this contract was to adapt the U.S. Army’s proven
technology for the detection of non-metallic land mines
to soil evaluation application for the construction
industry. Successful proof-of-principle demonstrations
were performed and Humboldt Mfg. Co., of Norridge
Illinois, was recruited to commercialize HSG.

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